What's so Bad about Radon?

Radon gas is the second leading cause of lung cancer. Radon is invisible, odorless, and tasteless — making it impossible to detect without specialized equipment. Approximately 18,000 lung cancer deaths related to radon occur in the United States every year, and it's estimated that 1 in 15 homes has radon levels above the thresholds recommended by the EPA.

I am certified by the Pennsylvania and New Jersey Departments of Environmental Protection and use Sun Nuclear 1028XP state of the art radon testers to protect against tampering and to provide accurate results. Pennsylvania and New Jersey have some of the most rigorous standards in the country for Radon Testers.

Radon Health Risk Information

Since Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Surgeon General strongly recommend taking further action when the home's radon test results are 4.0 pCi/L or greater. The national average indoor radon level is about 1.3 pCi/L. The higher the home's radon level the greater the health risk to you and your family. Reducing your radon levels can be done easily, effectively and fairly inexpensively. Even homes with very high radon levels can be reduced below 4.0 pCi/L. For further information about reducing elevated radon levels please refer to the "Pennsylvania's Consumer's Guide to Radon Reduction."

What Exactly Is Radon?

Radon is a chemical element (Rn) and a member of the noble gases. It is radioactive, and so can cause damage to the DNA of a living cell. Radon is naturally produced from the radioactive breakdown of uranium, thorium, and radium.

While radon is present around the world, it can be especially troublesome in certain regions where there are high concentrations of uranium in the ground, such as specific areas in New England and northern regions of the United States.

What Can You Do about Radon?

The first step to protect yourself and your family is to check the concentration of radon in the home. I provide radon tests using specialized equipment to give you an accurate measurement of radon concentration levels. If the radon measurement is greater than 4 picocuries per liter, then it is recommended that you install a radon mitigation system. The most common radon mitigation systems use a fan to pull in radon from beneath the house, and vent it outdoors where it is quickly diluted to safe levels.

Radon Testing in Northeast PA and Northwest New Jersey

Honor Inspection Services provides radon testing in Northeast Pennsylvania and Northwest New Jersey including Bethlehem, Allentown, Easton, Phillipsburg, and surrounding areas.

NOTICE FOR PENNSYLVANIA: THE RADON CERTIFICATION ACT REQUIRES THAT ANYONE WHO PERFORMS RADON TESTING, MITIGATION, OR LABORATORY ANALYSIS ACTIVITIES MUST BE CERTIFIED BY THE PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION. ANY PERSON PROVIDING THESE RADON SERVICES SHALL PRESENT TO THE CLIENT A CURRENT DEP-ISSUED PHOTO IDENTIFICATION CARD UPON REQUEST. IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS, YOU MAY CONTACT DEP AT THE BUREAU OF RADIATION PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION, P.O. BOX 8469, HARRISBURG, PA., 17105-8469, (717) 783-3594.

NEW JERSEY Radon Information can be obtained at the State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection website.

The best way to know whether or not radon poses a danger to you and your family is to have a radon test performed by a certified inspector. Schedule your test now or give me a call at (484) 484-8533.